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E-cigarette Construction: Part 1

General information on e-cigarette construction. Getting to know your vaporizer, from batteries to clearomizers. This will help you understand how they work and what the options are. Typical elements include a liquid delivery and container system, a power source, and an atomizer. Many e-cigarettes are constructed of replaceable parts, while disposable devices combine all parts into a single piece that is discarded when its fluid has run out.

Atomizer

In addition to the battery, the atomizer is the main component of every vaporizer. Although numerous kinds of atomizers are in use, they typically consist of a small heating element that evaporates the fluid, as well as a wicking device that draws liquid in.

A small strand of resistance wire is wound around the wicking the device and then linked to the + and - poles of the apparatus. When activated the resistance wire (or coil) rapidly heats up, turning the fluid into a vapor, which is then inhaled in by the user.

The electrical resistance of the coil affects the power based on the voltage of the battery. This plays an essential role in the amount and quality of the vapor that is produced by the atomizer. Atomizer resistances typically vary from 1.5 ohms to 3.0, however they can go as low as 0.1 ohms in the most extreme DIY coil structure (which produce big quantities of vapor but can flash burn your liquid, be a fire hazard, or cause other dangerous battery failures if the user is not careful. Always make sure you are well-informed about basic electrical concepts and how they relate to battery safety before attempting any rebuildable or sub-ohm cores.

Wicking products differ significantly between atomizers but silica fibers are the most typical in manufactured atomizers. "Rebuildable" or "do it yourself" atomizers can utilize silica, cotton, hemp, porous ceramic, bamboo yarn, oxidized stainless steel mesh and even wire rope cables as wicking products.

A vast range of atomizers and e-liquid container combos are on the market Including:

510 Atomizers for dripping or use with 510 cartridges.

510-T Atomizers for dripping or use with T-tank cartridges witch allow the tank to be punctured by the atomizers internal needle.

Cartomizers

Most of the apparatuses that mimic the cigarette use a "cartomizer" (the combination of the words cartridge and atomizer) as an e-liquid distribution system. This includes a heating element surrounded by a liquid-soaked poly-foam that acts as an e-liquid holder. It is usually disposed of when the e-liquid gets a burnt taste, which can happen when the coil is dry or when the cartomizer gets consistently flooded (gurgling) due to sedimentation of the wick and consistently burned. Cartomizers typically last about two weeks on the high end, based on use. Options for cartomizers include the 510 single-coil Cartomizer and the Dual-coil Cartomizer. Many cartomizers are refillable even if not advertised as such and some are fully "rebuildable".

Cartomizers can be used on their own or in combination with a tank that permits more e-liquid ability. In this case the word "cartotank" has actually been coined. When used in a tank, the cartomizer is placed in a glass, metal or plastic tube and slots or holes have to be drilled on the sides of the cartomizer to allow liquid to reach the coil.

Clearomizers

Clearomizers, not unlike cartotanks, utilize a tank in which an atomizer is inserted or in most newer versions, have a replaceable core assembly. These newer and more efficient gravity fed versions consist of a wide variety including the bottom core Kanger and ARO Evods, Kanger T3S, and Anyvape Davide and Mini Davide. Top core clearomizers require the liquid to be "Wicked up" and can be fairly efficient but require that attention be paid to the liquid level so that the wick have plenty of saturation to pull the liquid to the core. These consist of such clearomizers as the CE5, Mini Vivi, and some disposables like the CE4.

Continue to: E-cigarette Construction: Part 2

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